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Newsletter 20

31 October, 2018

The Medieval Chronicle. Die mittelalterliche Chronik. La chronique médievale

Newsletter / Bulletin / Rundschreiben 20

Autumn / Automne / Herbst 2018

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9th International Conference of The Medieval Chronicle. Die mittelalterliche Chronik. La Chronique au Moyen Age. 

13 – 17 July 2020, Poznan, Poland

Organizing Institutions:

Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Instytut Slawistyki, Polskiej Akademii Nauk) and Adam Mickiewicz University (Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza).
For more information on these two institutions, see below.

For more information write to: Ryszard Grzesik, grzesik@man.poznan.pl, or Józef Dobosz, doboszjozef@hotmail.com

Dates: 13 (Monday) to 17 (Friday) July, 2020.

On 18 July (Saturday) there will be two excursions (by coach):

1) The Piast Route1: Gniezno – Strzelno

2) The Piast Route 2: Strongholds Lednica – Grzybowo – Giecz

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Information on the Organizing Institutionsof the 2020 Conference at Poznan

Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Instytut Slawistyki, Polskiej Akademii Nauk)

The Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences was established in 1954 and connected a number of research units dealing with Slavic Studies in several fields of the humanities. The editorial team of the eight-volume Słownik starożytności słowiańskich(Lexicon of Slavic Antiquities, henceforth: SSS) was one of these units. The Lexicon was prepared from the early 1950s, although the idea had originated at the turn of 1930s. The edition was finished in the mid 1990s. During the preparation of the SSS, we started a new project: an edition of Testimonia najdawniejszych dziejów Słowian(Testimonies of the Ancient History of the Slavs), which contains excerpts from Greek and Latin narratives with information about the Slavic people in a wider narrative context. The excerpts are published in the original language with a Polish translation and an extensive introduction and commentaries. At first they were edited by Prof. Wincenty Swoboda and Dr. Alina Brzóstkowska, and now by Prof. Anna Kotłowska and Prof. Ryszard Grzesik, both members of the Medieval Chronicle Society.

Adam Mickiewicz University (Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza)

The Institute of History at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań was founded in 1956. The traditions of the Poznań historical milieu, however, date back to 1919 and the Historical Seminary at Poznań University, which was transformed in 1950 into the Department of History. Today part of the Faculty of History at Adam Mickiewicz University, the Institute of History has a total of 100 teaching and research staff (including 15 full professors, 50 associate professors and habilitated doctors, and 35 assistant professors), dozens of doctoral students and seven technical and administrative staff members. The Institute educates over 800 first and second degree students in seven specialisations and majors, both in full-time programmes and part-time weekend and individual study formats. Structurally, the Institute is divided into 19 units (Zakłady); it has its own photographic, graphic and computer studios and a publishing house, which every year publishes more than 30 monographs and four journals. The research conducted by the staff covers the full chronological spectrum of universal history (from the history of the Middle East in antiquity to the 20th/21st century) and the history of Poland (from the birth of the Polish statehood to the present), the methodology and theory of history and archival studies.

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The Medieval Chronicle Series

IMPORTANT NOTICE – Permanent 50 per cent Discount for MCS members

Members of the MCS are offered a permanent discount of 50 per cent on any volumes of MedChronif these are ordered directly from the publisher at:

http://www.brill.com/products/series/medieval-chronicle

To obtain the discount price use the discount code: 70257

The Medieval Chronicle 12 is now printing, and will soon be available from the publisher

The Medieval Chronicle13 and 14– In progress

Members are reminded that they may always submit articles or short text editionsfor publication in our series.

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Obituary – Dr David Pattison (1942–2018)

The death on 3 September of Dr David Pattison (Emeritus Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, since his retirement in 2005), following a long illness, has deprived us of an inspiring teacher and a fine scholar. David had held the post of Tutorial Fellow at Magdalen since 1969. He was the author of From Legend to Chronicle: the treatment of epic material in Alphonsine historiography(Medium Aevum Monographs, NS, 13; Oxford: Society for the Study of Mediaeval Languages and Literature, 1983). Among his other works were the monograph based on his doctoral thesis, Early Spanish Suffixes(Publications of the Philological Society, 27; Oxford: Blackwell [for the Society],1975) and a good number of articles on medieval Spanish topics. His commitment to learned societies (both in and beyond medieval studies) was notable; he also successfully discharged important administrative roles within his College and University. The Medieval Chronicle Society remembers him as a much appreciated member of the Advisory Board of The Medieval Chronicle, which he joined in 2002. This generous, supportive, and collegial scholar will be sorely missed.

David Hook

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New Projects

The Middle English Prose BrutChronicle

Since 2015, Michelle Warren (Dartmouth College, USA) has been leading a digital research project centered on a Middle English Prose Brutchronicle: Remix the Manuscript: A Chronicle of Digital Experiments (https://sites.dartmouth.edu/RemixBrut). The project team has now published an article describing the first phase of the project in the online journal Archive Journal, http://www.archivejournal.net/essays/remix-the-medieval-manuscript-experiments-with-digital-infrastructure/.

Currently, Remix the Manuscript is focused on rebuilding and revising the online catalogue previously available as Imagining History: Perspectives on Late Medieval Vernacular Historiography. This project was led by John Thompson at Queen’s University, Belfast, with primary contributions from Jason O’Rourke and Ryan Perry (2002-05). Many of the original goals for cultural mapping and data analysis remained incomplete and the catalogue itself has been offline since 2017. Michelle Warren is undertaking a new iteration in partnership with Dartmouth College Library, with the goal of producing a sustainable database as well as other digital outputs. The first data set has been released through theRemixblog; you can subscribe to receive notice of future releases and interim updates at:https://sites.dartmouth.edu/RemixBrut/2018/10/07/re-imaginary-history-release-1-0/

The Canterbury Roll

The Canterbury Roll – A Digital Edition. With Latin transcription, English translation, notes, and introductory material. Ed. Chris Jones, Christopher Thomson, Maree Shirota, Elisabeth Rolston, Thandi Parker, and Jennifer Middendorf. Canterbury University Press, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-98-850307-3

Open Access Digital Facsimile of Christchurch, University of Canterbury, MS 1
The Canterbury Roll is a 15th-century English genealogical text. It was created in the late 1420s/early 1430s and subsequently modified on a number of occasions before final revisions were made to it, most probably during the reign of Richard III (1483–1485). The genealogy is accompanied by an extensive commentary in Latin. The five-metre long manuscript roll, the work of at least four scribes, was purchased by the University of Canterbury in 1918 from the Maude family of Christchurch.

This open access Digital Edition presents a new transcription and English translation of the Roll, both of which are mapped to a high quality digital facsimile. The edition is accompanied by academic apparatus, a detailed introduction, and full documentation. It is embedded within a website that provides further contextual information on the Roll and its history.

The Digital Edition includes:

– A new, high definition facsimile of the complete Canterbury Roll manuscript.

– The first new English translation and Latin transcription of the Roll produced in a century.

– A downloadable edition of Arnold Wall’s 1919 edition of the Roll as well as a “Getting Started” handbook and detailed User Guide.

– Accompanying essays that explore the origins of the Roll, its use as medieval propaganda, and its place in New Zealand history.

The Project Team welcome feedback on any aspect of the project and are particularly interested in commissioning peer review reports that will inform the release of Stage 2 in 2019. Expressions of interest from established scholars and any comments should be sent to the General Editor (chris.jones@canterbury.ac.nz).

The Literary Heritage of Anglo-Dutch Relations, c.1050–1600

This new project, based at the University of Bristol, has been awarded funding from the Leverhulme Trust. It is carried out by professors Ad Putter (Bristol) and Elisabeth van Houts (Cambridge), and postdoc researchers Sjoerd Levelt and Moreed Arbabzadah. It further includes outreach activities, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, in collaboration with special educational needs charity Flash of Splendour Arts, Oscar-winning animation studios Aardman, and the Bodleian Library of the University of Oxford, which will host an exhibition in 2020.

Het Berghse Kroniekenhandschrift – New Project and Call for Papers

The Dutch castle “Huis Bergh” in ‘s-Heerenberg (Guelders) has recently acquired a beautifully illustrated manuscript (olimAnholt, Fürstlich Salm-Salm’sche Bibliothek, Ms. Schmitz 42), showing the arms of the lords of Bergh on the opening page. It can be dated to c.1453-1461, and is the earliest surviving and only illustrated chronicle of the Rhime-Meuse area. The manuscript contains twelve chronicles of popes, emperors and various regions in the Low Countries, in particular of the Lower Rhine area.

Call for Papers

Scholars interested in contributing to a volume of studies on the manuscript, its contents and its historical context are invited to submit proposals by 30 November 2018 to Wim van Anrooij (w.van.anrooij@hum.leidenuniv.nl), editor of the volume together with Jeanne Verbij-Schillings. Proposals must include a working title and a short description of the intended article (max. one A4), as well as the name and e-mail address of the author.

For more information, see the website (in Dutch):

https://huisbergh.nl/bezoekersinformatie/collectie/kroniekenhandschrift/call-for-papers/

Hungary and Hungarians in Central and East European Narrative Sources (10th–17th centuries)

On 21-22 March 2018 a conference was held in Pécs on this subject. A volume with papers presented at this conference will next year be published by Pécs University Press. For the programme, see the attachmentto this Newsletter.

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New Publications

England

Livia Visser-Fuchs, History as Pastime. Jean de Wavrin and His Collection of Chronicles of England. Shaun Tyas Publishing, Donnington, UK, 2018; 682 pp.; 16 pp. of colour illustrations; numerous appendices with further details about manuscripts and texts; bibliography; index. ISBN: 9781907730696. $85.95.

The Burgundian author Jean de Wavrin (c.1400–c.1477) has been known to historians for a long time, but his work is usually considered derivative and of little importance. Closer study revealed that he had an interesting career, first serving in the Anglo-Burgundian army, then marrying a rich widow and settling down to a quieter life in Lille, and to composing his vast compilation of histories of England. At the same time he became a supplier of romances to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, and an avid collector of all kinds of books for himself. A very unusual draughtsman, whom he almost uniquely patronised, was later named after him. Wavrin’s life as a soldier and civilian, ambassador and courtier, is presented as fully as possible and put in context; his library and his interests are analysed; his own book, its creation, use of sources, purpose and value are discussed, and its often beautifully illustrated surviving manuscripts described and explained.

For a special offer for members of the MCS, see the flyerattached to the Newsletter.

Beal, Jane, ‘The Idea of Music in the Polychronicon.’ The Medieval Chronicle12 (forthcoming 2018).

Beal, Jane, ‘Preaching and History: The Audience of Ranulf Hidgen’s Ars componendi sermones and the Polychronicon.’ Medieval Sermon Studies 62 (forthcoming 2018).

France

Bertrand Boysset, Chronique. Ed. M.-R. Bonnet, P. Gautier Dalché, P. Rigaud. Textes vernaculaires du moyen âge (TVMA 20). Turnhout: Brepols, 2018. 202 p., 7 b/w ill. ISBN: 978-2-503-58053-1. € 75 excl. tax.

La chronique de Bertran Boysset, de la moyenne bourgeoisie d’Arles (v. 1350-1415),est un texte difficile à classer. Elle comporte certains aspects du livre de raison, mais l’intérêt de l’auteur dépasse largement le cercle restreint de l’environnement familial. Proche d’Avignon à l’époque du Grand Schisme, dans une région troublée par les rivalités politiques et les exactions des gens de guerre, l’auteur note non seulement ses activités (l’exploitation de ses vignes et de ses pêcheries), les phénomènes météorologiques, les faits qui sortent de l’ordinaire, mais encore ce qui se passe à la cour papale à Avignon et à Rome, ainsi que les séjours des souverains. C’est un témoignage exceptionnel sur la vie quotidienne et sur la perception du monde d’un laïc de culture moyenne, qui veut par ses écrits se situer dans le cadre plus large d’une cité autrefois prestigieuse.

Rédigée en provençal avec quelques passages en latin, elle est transmise en trois versions, dont deux autographes. On édite ici la deuxième version (Paris, BnF 5728), accompagnée d’une traduction française et d’une introduction.

Patrick Gautier Dalché est directeur de recherche émérite (CNRS, IRHT) et directeur d’études émérites (Ecole pratique des hautes études).

Marie Rose Bonnet, docteur ès- lettres, membre de l’Académie d’Arles, a enseigné la langue et la littérature médiévale de langue d’oc à l’Université de Provence.

Philippe Rigaud, membre de l’Académie d’Arles, est diplômé de l’Ecole pratique des hautes études.

A Knight for the Ages: Jacques de Lalaing and the Art of Chivalry. Ed. Elizabeth Morrison. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2018. 192pp., 94 color illus. ISBN 978-1606065754. $ 55.

In 2016, the Getty acquired one of the greatest productions from the last flowering of Flemish secular manuscript illumination, the finest illuminated copy of the Livre des faits de Jacques de Lalaing (Book of the Deeds of Jacques de Lalaing,Ms. 114 in the collection). The vibrant text and illuminations of the Getty’s manuscript concern the adventurous life of Jacques de Lalaing (1421-1453), celebrated knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece and perhaps the most famed tournament fighter of the Middle Ages. The miniatures largely concentrate on Jacques’s unparalleled feats of arms, as he made his way across Europe challenging and defeating most of the prominent knights of his day. The manuscript’s images have never before been published in color, and the details of the life story of Jacques de Lalaing may be unfamiliar to scholars. Therefore, the first part of the book is devoted to a plot summary and a reproduction of all the manuscript’s miniatures, accompanied by individual translations of the pertinent portions of text. The second part of the book features a series of interdisciplinary essays in a wide range of fields, ranging from a study of its hero’s biography to a consideration of the authors and artists who made the manuscript possible, to the arms and fighting techniques depicted, to the manuscript’s place in the family’s history.

Elizabeth Morrison is senior curator of manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The bookcan be purchased on the Getty’s bookstore site at: https://shop.getty.edu/products/a-knight-for-the-ages-jacques-de-lalaing-and-the-art-of-chivalry-978-1606065754#

Germany

Nina Rowe, ‘Shrugging at the Sacred: Dreams, Punishments, and Feasting in the Daniel-Nebuchadnezzar Cycles of Illuminated Weltchroniken, circa 1400.’ Gesta57 (2018): 43-68.

Nina Rowe, ‘Devotion and Dissent in Late-Medieval Illuminated World Chronicles.’ Art History41 (2018): 12-41.

Hungary

The Illuminated Chronicle. of the Deeds of the Hungarians / Chronica de gestis Hungarorum. Ed. and trans. János M. Bak and László Veszprémy, with a preface by Norbert Kersken. CEMT IX. ISBN: 978-963-386-264-3. $85.00 / €70.00 / £62.00, and ISBN 978-963-386-261, $65.00 / €56.00 / £49.00.

TheIlluminated Chronicle was composed in 1358 in the international artistic style at the royal court of Louis I of Hungary. Its text, presented here in a new edition and translation, is the most complete record of Hungary’s medieval historical tradition, going back to the eleventh century and including the mythical past of its people. The 147 pictures in this manuscript – formerly known as the Vienna Chronicle – are not merely occasional illustrations added to some exemplars, but text and image are closely connected and mutually related to each other, to qualify it as a proper “illuminated chronicle”. The artistic value of the miniatures is quite high, and the characters are drawn with detail and with a knowledge of anatomy. Forty-two of the miniatures are included in the present volume. A full color facsimile will be accessible online.

The English translation is based on a newly transcribed Latin text, and a CD with the facsimile of the codex is attached. The volume is accompanied by a Subsidium: Studies to the Illuminated Chronicle, with essays on the codex, the textual tradition, the illuminations, the heraldry and the afterlife of the text. Two studies treat two significant chapters: on the presentation of dynastic struggles in the eleventh century and the central figure of a significant part, King (St.) Ladislas.

Volume 10 of CEMT, the Chronicle of the Czechs by Cosmas of Prague, is soon to be published.

Further details and additional titles of this important series of source material are available on the CEMT website: http://ceupress.com/series/central-european-medieval-texts.

Italy

Storia dei vescovi napoletani (I secolo – 876) / Gesta Episcoporum Neapolitanorum. Ed.and translation into Italian by Luigi Andrea Berto. Pisa: Pisa University Press, 2018. € 18.

Luigi Andrea Berto, Cristiani e musulmani nell’Italia dei primi secoli del Medioevo. Percezioni,scontri e incontri. Milan: Jouvence, 2018. € 20.

Spain / Portugal

David Hook, The Hispanic, Portuguese, and Latin American Manuscripts of Sir Thomas Phillipps. 2 vols. Publications of the Magdalen Iberian Medieval Studies Seminar, 5. Westbury on Trym: Fontaine Notre Dame/David Hook, 2017. ISBN 978-0-9517564-3-0. £ 98.

The catalogue lists all the Iberian historiographic texts, including the Latin ones, that the author has been able to identify in the (notoriously) vast collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps. Volume I is the study of the collection and Phillipps, vol. II is the edited texts of the relevant entries from the extant in-house catalogues produced by Phillipps and his successors (mainly Thomas Fitzroy Fenwick).

Switzerland

Roberto Leggero, Domatori dei prìncipi e altre note di storia svizzera (secoli XII-XVI). Udine: Forum, 2018. 271 pp. ISBN: 8832830701.€ 25.

The book relates to the problem of exploitation of the natural resources in the alpine communities of South Switzerland during Middle Ages. It touches the theme of the construction of real estate assets of the rural communes, the management of common pool resources (CPR) and the role of CPR administration in the political life of medieval Switzerland.

The book offers also a first time edition of Alessandro Giovio’s Description of Switzerland. Alessandro was a nephew of the well-known historian and bishop Paolo Giovio.

Roberto Leggero is Assistente alla ricerca at the USI-Accademia di Architettura, Mendrisio, Italy.

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Brief Notices 

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger@comcast.netor croiniceoir@gmail.com, to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

Boydell & Brewer’s Writing History in the Middle AgesSeries

History-writing was a vital form of expression throughout the European Middle Ages, and is fundamental to our understanding of medieval societies, politics, modes of expression, cultural memory, and social identity. This series publishes innovative work on history-writing from across the medieval world; monographs, collections of essays. Editions of texts will also be considered.

For more information, write to the Series Editors:

Dr Henry Bainton, Department of English and Related Literature, University of York.  henry.bainton@york.ac.uk

Professor Lars Boje Mortensen, Head of Centre, University of Southern Denmark  labo@sdu.dk

And see also: Writing History in the Middle Ages series

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Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html

Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/
http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

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MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Professor Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Professor Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley[at]liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Professor Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is: @medievalchron so please follow us and spread the word.

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The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper, Dept of English – Utrecht University – The Netherlands, E-mail: e.s.kooper@[at]uu.nl

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Newsletter 19

19 February, 2018

Newsletter / Bulletin / Rundschreiben 19

Autumn / Automne / Herbst 2017

9th International Conference, The Medieval Chronicle/ Die mittelalterliche Chronik/ La Chronique au Moyen Age, 2020, Poznan, Poland

Organizing Institutions:

– Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Instytut Slawistyki, Polskiej Akademii Nauk)

– Adam Mickiewicz University (Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza)

For more information write to:

Ryszard Grzesik, grzesik@man.poznan.pl, or Józef Dobosz, doboszjozef@hotmail.com

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The Medieval Chronicle Series

IMPORTANT NOTICE – Permanent 50 per cent Discount for MCS members

Members of the MCS are offered a permanent discount of 50 per cent on any volumes of MedChron if these are ordered directly from the publisher at:

http://www.brill.com/products/series/medieval-chronicle

To obtain the discount price use the discount code: 70257.

 

The Medieval Chronicle 11 will appear in November 2017

and then be available from the publisher:

http://www.brill.com/products/book/medieval-chronicle-11

 

The Medieval Chronicle 12 – In progress

Members are reminded, and in particular the participants of the

2017 Lisbon conference, that they may always submit articles

or short text editions for publication in our series.

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New Projects

The Estoria de Espanna Digital

The Estoria de Espanna Digital is an AHRC-financed project to construct a digital edition of the most important medieval Iberian chronicle – the Estoria de Espanna, written by King Alfonso the Wise of Castile and Leon in 1272. To mark the launch of the edition (available at http://estoria.bham.ac.uk/blog/) the Biblioteca Nacional de España, the Biblioteca General Histórica de la Universidad de Salamanca, the Biblioteca de Menéndez Pelayo (Santander) and the James Ford Bell Library at the University of Minnesota have simultaneously put on display their manuscripts of the Estoria in an exhibition entitled “El hallazgo del pasado”. The Estoria Digital project, in conjunciton with the Humanities Research Institute of the University of Sheffield, has constructed a digital exhibition to complement these (https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/estoria/). The exhibitions take place until mid April.

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New Publications

General

Michele Campopiano and Henry Bainton, eds., Universal Chronicles in the High Middle Ages. Writing History in the Middle Ages 4. York Medieval Press, 2017. 328 pages. ISBN: 978 1 903153 73 4. £ 60.

New perspectives on and interpretations of the popular medieval genre of the universal chronicle.

Found in pre-modern cultures of every era and across the world, from the ancient Near East to medieval Latin Christendom, the universal chronicle is simultaneously one of the most ubiquitous pre-modern cultural forms and one of the most overlooked. Universal chronicles narrate the history of the whole world from the time of its creation up to the then present day, treating the world’s affairs as though they were part of a single organic reality, and uniting various strands of history into a unifed, coherent story. They reveal a great deal about how the societies that produced them understood their world and how historical narrative itself can work to produce that understanding.

The essays here offer new perspectives on the genre, from a number of different disciplines, demonstrating their vitality, flexibility and cultural importance, They reveal them to be deeply political texts, which allowed history-writers and their audiences to locate themselves in space, time and in the created universe. Several chapters address the manuscript context, looking at the innovative techniques of compilation, structure and layout that placed them at the cutting edge of medieval book technology. Others analyse the background of universal chronicles, and identify their circulation amongst different social groups; there are also investigations into their literary discourse, patronage, authorship and diffusion.

(see: https://boydellandbrewer.com/series/writing-history-in-the-middle-ages.html)

Michele Campopiano is Senior Lecturer in Medieval Latin Literature at the University of York

Henry Bainton is Lecturer in High Medieval Literature at the University of York.

Armenia

Andrews, Tara L. Mattʿēos Uṙhayecʿi and His Chronicle: History as Apocalypse in a Crossroads of Cultures. Series: The Medieval Mediterranean, 108. Leiden: Brill, 2016. E-ISBN: 978 9004330351.

(see also her article ‘The New Age of Prophecy: The Chronicle of Matthew of Edessa and Its Place in Armenian Historiography’ in MedChron 6 (2009): 105-23).

England

Laura Ashe, The Oxford English Literary History. I. 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation. Oxford University Press, 2017. 486 p. ISBN: 9780199575381. £ 35.

James Simpson, The Oxford English Literary History. II. 1350-1547: Reform and Cultural Revolution. Oxford University Press, 2004. 680 p. ISBN: 9780199265534. £ 35.

Launching the 21st-century successor to the Oxford History of English Literature, these two companion volumes inaugurate a new era in literary history, with an emphasis not just on canonical texts and authors but on the contexts in which literature was written, and its relationship to its period.

Ashe gives a new perspective on the breadth and depth of medieval culture and society. Individual chapters cover particular themes. It is genuinely interdisciplinary, drawing on a range of methods and approaches, and explores works written in a variety of languages, so that the reader encounters literature in the way that contemporaries would have.

Simpson provides a fresh and groundbreaking reassessment of the impact of the Reformation and Renaissance on English literature. Reversing accepted truisms, he shows how the diversity characteristic of medieval literature – in terms of genre, audience, even language itself – was narrowed and simplified by the huge cultural changes of the early 16th century. It ranges from Chaucer, Wyclif, and the Gawain-poet, and a host of less canonical writers and texts, to Wyatt, Leland, and Surrey and their novel poetic forms and new conceptions of history.

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-english-literary-history-9780199575381?q=OELH&lang=en&cc=gb#

Margaret Connolly & Raluca Radulescu, eds. Editing and Interpretation of Middle English Texts. Essays in Honour of William Marx. Texts and Transitions vol. 12. Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. 350 p. ISBN 978-2-503-56847-8. € 85.

These fifteen essays, all published here for the first time, explore issues related to the editing and interpretation of Middle English literature. These include the treatment of all types of evidence (variant readings; punctuation; capitalization; rubrication; physical layout), in relation to both manuscript transmission and the transition from manuscript to print. The editorial representation of these and other aspects constitutes an act of textual interpretation at the most fundamental level, which subsequently influences scholarly understanding. Two major fields of writing, religious texts and chronicles, provide the focus of this enquiry. Major works that receive attention include Trevisa’s translation of the Polychronicon, the Middle English Brut, Piers Plowman, Love’s Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ, and Mirk’s Festial; a wide range of shorter devotional and historical texts, in both verse and prose, is also considered, as are aspects related to the translation of texts into Middle English. Almost all of the contributors are experienced editors of medieval texts. Some contribute further insights about texts they have edited, whilst others offer new editions of previously unpublished works. Collectively these essays foreground the many and varied matters of interpretation that confront the editor of Middle English texts.

Julia Marvin, The Construction of Vernacular History in the Anglo-Norman Prose Brut Chronicle: The Manuscript Culture of Late Medieval England. Writing History in the Middle Ages 5. York Medieval Press, 2017. 296 pages. ISBN: 978 1 903153 74 1. £ 60.

It is the first full-length interpretive study of the prose Brut tradition, setting its manuscript context alongside textual analysis. Using the Anglo-Norman Oldest Version as a touchstone, it investigates the chronicle’s social ideals, its representation of women, and its distinctive versions of such elements of British history as the Trojan foundation myth, Norman Conquest, and Arthur and Merlin.

In addition to greatly expanding our knowledge of the prose Brut tradition itself, the book challenges common presumptions about popular thought and culture and as a result will, we hope, be of significant use to scholars working in a number of areas in medieval studies.

A full description may be found on its webpage at

https://boydellandbrewer.com/the-construction-of-vernacular-history-in-the-anglo-norman-prose-i-brut-i-chronicle-hb.html

Livia Visser-Fuchs, History as Pastime. Jean de Wavrin and His Collection of Chronicles of England. Shaun Tyas Publishing, Donnington, UK. (forthcoming 2018); c. 600 pp.; 16 pp. of colour illustrations; numerous appendices with further details about manuscripts and texts; bibliography; index. £ 40 (there will be a special offer for MCS members).

The Burgundian author Jean de Wavrin (c.1400-c.1477) has been known to historians for a long time, but his work is usually considered derivative and of little importance. Closer study revealed that he had a interesting career, first serving in the Anglo-Burgundian army, then marrying a rich widow and settling down to a quieter life in Lille, and to composing his vast compilation of histories of England. At the same time he became a supplier of romances to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, and an avid collector of all kinds of books for himself. A very unusual draughtsman, whom he almost uniquely patronised, was later named after him. Wavrin’s life as a soldier and civilian, ambassador and courtier, is presented as fully as possible and put in context; his library and his interests are analysed; his own book, its creation, use of sources, purpose and value are discussed, and its often beautifully illustrated surviving manuscripts described and explained.

France

Isabelle Guyot-Bachy, La Flandre et les Flamands au miroir des historiens du royaume (Xe–XVe siècle). Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses universitaires du Septentrion, 2017. 384 pp. ISBN 978-2-7574-1489-7. € 35.

Quel rôle jouèrent les Flamands dans la naissance de la « nation France » ? Que savait de Bouvines, Courtrai, Cassel ou Roosebeke, marqueurs mémoriels de cinq siècles d’histoire entre le comté de Flandre et le royaume de France, le clerc breton ou le noble provençal ? Que disait-on en Normandie ou en Auvergne, de la Flandre, des Flamands, de leur identité mais aussi de leur appartenance au royaume ? Les Français – ou tout au moins leurs élites – partageaient-ils avec le roi et avec ceux qui gravitaient à l’ombre de son pouvoir une perception commune de cette « question flamande » qui, des Carolingiens aux Valois, fut récurrente et souvent brûlante ?

Le récit que l’on poursuit ici est moins celui des événements tels qu’ils se sont déroulés, que celui de la construction « imaginée » du passé qu’offrent les chroniques médiévales et, à leur suite à partir du xvie siècle, une grande variété de textes dont l’ambition fut de raconter à un public appelé peu à peu à former une nation une « histoire de France par la mémoire ».

Laurent Guitton, ‘Fastes et malheurs du métier de favorite: Antoinette de Maignelais, de la cour de France à la cour de Bretagne (1450-1470).’

In Maîtresses et favorites dans les coulisses du pouvoir en Occident, du Moyen Âge à l’époque moderne. Ed. Juliette Dor, Marie-Élisabeth Henneau et Alain Marchandisse (dir.), Actes du colloque international de Liège, 13-14 décembre 2012, Saint-Étienne, Publications de l’Université de Saint-Étienne, 2017.

Keith Busby: see under Ireland.

Livia Visser-Fuchs: see under England.

Ireland / France

Keith Busby, French in Medieval Ireland, Ireland in Medieval French. The Paradox of Two Worlds. Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. 375 p. ISBN: 978-2-503-57021-1. € 110.

This book is a ground-breaking study of the cultural and linguistic consequences of the English invasion of
Ireland in 1169, first analysing in detail French-language texts produced in Ireland before examining the ways in which the country is portrayed in French literature of the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries. It incorporates the results of original archival research and is characterized by close attention to linguistic details of expression and communication, as well as historical, codicological, and literary contexts.

Italy

Italian Carolingian Historical and Poetic Texts. Edition and translation into English by Luigi Andrea Berto. Pisa: Pisa University Press, 2016.

Luigi Andrea Berto, I raffinati metodi d’indagine e il mestiere dello storico. L’alto medioevo italiano all’inizio del terzo millennio. Mantua: Universitas Studiorum, 2016.

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Calls for Papers

Call for contributions: Medieval Chronicles in the Early Modern period

Proposals are invited for contributions to a collection examining the Nachleben, as well as instances of uninterrupted continuation, of Europe’s medieval chronicling traditions from c.1500 to 1800 in a series of case studies. While we hope to attract papers collectively representing a wide geographical spread, these are not intended as national surveys but as original essays focusing on different aspects of the representation of the past during the early modern period when an old form of historical writing, no longer the principal form of representing the past, was adapted to serve new purposes as factual source, alternative medium, collectable item, or inspiration for poetry and fiction.

Possible topics of interest include, but are by no means limited to:

– early modern continuations of medieval chronicles;

– early edition projects of medieval chronicles;

– printed chronicle traditions, including town chronicles and almanac chronicles;

– early modern artistic responses to medieval chronicles;

– use of material from medieval chronicles in different contexts, such as drama, political discourse, architecture, painting;

– collectors of manuscripts with medieval chronicles;

– chronicles in archives;

– survival – and/or loss – of medieval chronicle manuscripts;

– interactions between chronicles and other genres of historical writing;

– the use of medieval chronicles as sources by scholars in the 16th–18th centuries.

At this stage, we invite proposals of 400 words, with additionally a select bibliography, giving an indication of the proposed subject and sources, and including a brief description of previous research.

Deadline for proposals: 1 January 2018, to sjoerd.levelt@bilkent.edu.tr

Daniel Woolf (Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario)   –   Sjoerd Levelt (Bilkent University, Ankara)

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Brief Notices

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger@comcast.net or croiniceoir@gmail.com, to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

Boydell & Brewer’s Writing History in the Middle Ages Series

History-writing was a vital form of expression throughout the European Middle Ages, and is fundamental to our understanding of medieval societies, politics, modes of expression, cultural memory, and social identity. This series publishes innovative work on history-writing from across the medieval world; monographs, collections of essays. Editions of texts will also be considered.

For more information, write to the Series Editors:

Dr Henry Bainton                                                                                Professor Lars Boje Mortensen

Department of English and Related Literature                          Head of Centre

University of York                                                                              University of Southern Denmark

henry.bainton@york.ac.uk                                                       labo@sdu.dk

And see also: Writing History in the Middle Ages series

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Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html
Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/

http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

=========================================================

MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society now has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Professor Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Professor Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley[at]liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Professor Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is:

@medievalchron

so please follow us and spread the word.

Professor Sarah Peverley – School of English – 19 Abercromby Square – Liverpool, L69 7ZG – UK

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The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper

Dept of English – Utrecht University – The Netherlands

E-mail: e.s.kooper[at]uu.nl

Newsletter 18

21 March, 2017

8th International Conference
The Medieval Chronicle / Die mittelalterliche Chronik / La Chronique au Moyen Age
10–14 July 2017
Lisbon, Portugal

The Organisers
Isabel de Barros Dias – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa
Maria João Branco – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Carlos Carreto – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa
Ana Paiva Morais – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Margarida Alpalhão – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Rodrigo Furtado – Universidade de Lisboa

For more information write to: Isabel de Barros Dias – Isabel.Dias@uab.pt

Website of the conference:
https://ielt.fcsh.unl.pt/pt/congressos-coloquios-jornadas/2010

You are welcome to submit abstracts for papers in one of the MCS langauages (English, French, German). You can reach the form for that via a button on the conference website, or via the following link:

http://moimoi.eventkey.pt/Geral/inserirresumo.aspx?evento=10&formulario=20

Please, note that the website is not complete yet; links to information on enrollment and accommodation will be set up as soon as possible

Keynote speakers include:
– Professor Georges Martin (Université Paris-Sorbonne)
– Professor Hermengildo Fernandes (Universidade de Lisboa)
– Professor Inés Fernández-Ordóñez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
– Professor Peter Linehan (University of Cambridge)
– Professor José Carlos Miranda (Universidade do Porto) and Professor Maria do Rosário Ferreira (Universidade de Coimbra)

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The Medieval Chronicle Series

IMPORTANT NOTICE – Permanent 50 per cent Discount for MCS members

Members of the MCS are offered a permanent discount of 50 per cent on any volumes of MedChron if these are ordered directly from the publisher at:

http://www.brill.com/products/series/medieval-chronicle

To obtain the discount price use the discount code: 70257.

The Medieval Chronicle 10 has appeared and is available from the publisher:

http://www.brill.com/products/book/medieval-chronicle-x

The Medieval Chronicle 11 – This will include many of the papers presented at the 2014 conference in Liverpool; beside that it will have reviews again and an edition of a short chronicle.

The Medieval Chronicle 12 – Deadline 1 March 2017.

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New Project

Illustrating history in medieval manuscripts 

Charles Melville (Professor of Persian History, University of Cambridge, editor of Persian Historiography, London: I.B. Tauris, 2012), will be taking up a visiting fellowship at the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures at Hamburg University (http://www.manuscript-cultures.uni-hamburg.de/index_e.html#termine) from January to March 2017, with a project to explore the illustration of history (in the form of chronicles) and myth (in the form of epic poetry) and their convergence in the Persian arts of the book. Apart from the scrutiny of the texts and the images themselves, this also involves a close examination of individual manuscripts; their unique choice of subjects for illustration; the placement of these paintings in the text; the use of rubrics to organise both the texts and the images; the establishment of iconographic traditions and the question of the dissemination (copying and patronage) of some texts at the expense of others. In addition to this, he would like to include the illustration of hagiographical literature, as the lives of saints provide a distinct, though often inter-related set of texts and precepts, sometimes enhancing royalty and sometimes challenging kingly authority.

Workshop 3 or 4 March 2017

The fellowship includes the possibility of organising a one-day workshop in Hamburg (proposed for 3 or 4 March) and in view of the great value of comparative approaches to the subject at the same period (c. 14th-15th centuries) in Western Europe, he would like to invite one or two scholars working in Germany (or other places not too far away from Hamburg), on such topics in medieval historical literature. If anyone would like to participate, suggest colleagues, or comment on this project, please get in touch directly with Prof. Melville (cpm1000@cam.ac.uk).

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New Publications

The Medieval Review

For those who do not know The Medieval Review, here is some information, taken from their website. It is an open access (free) journal of reviews, which since 1993 has been publishing reviews of current work in all areas of Medieval Studies, a field it interprets as broadly as possible. The electronic medium allows for very rapid publication of reviews, and provides a computer searchable archive of past reviews, both of which are of great utility to scholars and students around the world.

http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/tmr

General

Handbuch Chroniken des Mittelalters, ed. Gerhard Wolf und Norbert H. Ott. De Gruyter, 2016. 1042 pp.

This handbook systematically presents the most important European chronicles with their various concepts and functions and thus provides a first point of reference for the German-speaking reader. After an introduction by Gerhard Wolf, which charts the development and diversity of the genre and points to recent scholarship, the book is made up of broad surveys of sub-genres and of geographical regions. The first main section on Latin chronicles has surveys on origins narrations (Alheydis Plassmann), universal chronicles (Roman Deutinger) and papal and imperial chronicles (Heike Johanna Mierau). Then follows a much more detailed section on German-language chronicles, reflecting the general orientation of the work towards the interests German Studies: German-language chronicles of the 11th and 12th centuries (Stephan Müller), and of the 13th century (Mathias Herweg), Heinrich von München (Norbert H. Ott), north German rhyme chronicles (Gesine Mierke), dynastic history in Bavaria and Austria (Joachim Schneider), Switzerland (Regula Schmid), the Tutonic Order (Arno Mentzel-Reuters), urban chronicles (Peter Johanek), courtly house chronicles (Gerhard Wolf), Richental (Thomas Martin Buck) and the presentation of the Landshuter Hochzeit (Thomas Alexander Bauer). A single report on “visualized chronicles” (Tobias Tanneberger) appears as a section by itself. Then the focus shifts to a section of surveys on chronicles from beyond Germany, some of which focus on the vernacular, others covering both Latin and vernacular traditions: Scandinavia (Sverre Bagge), the Netherlands (Geert H. M. Claassens), Ireland, England, Wales and Scotland (Graeme Dunphy), France (Brigitte Burrichter), Italy (Cristian Bratu), Spain (Heidi R. Krauss-Sánchez), Eastern Central Europe (Ryszard Grzesik), Eastern Slavic lands (Márta Font) and the Byzantine tradition (Sergei Mariev). A final short section goes beyond Europe with surveys of Arabic (Kurz Franz) and Indo-Persian chronicles (Stphan Conermann).
Ashgate Chronicles in Translation Series

The Old French Chronicle of Morea : an account of Frankish Greece after the Fourth Crusade, trans. Anne Van Arsdall and Helen Moody. ACTH 28. Ashgate / Routledge, 2015.

Numerous Byzantine and Western sources describing the events of the Fourth Crusade have now been translated into English. However, the same is not true for material on Frankish Greece, despite this region’s importance to late medieval crusading. The Chronicle of Morea is the key source for the history of the Frankish states established in Greece after the conquest of Constantinople in 1204 and their relations with the reviving Byzantine Empire during the 13th century. It is also an important source for the growth of the Venetian maritime empire. Preserved in a unique fourteenth-century manuscript, the Old French version of the Chronicle of Morea is a contemporary account of Frankish feudal life transposed onto foreign soil. It describes clashes, conquests, and ransoms between the Franks and Byzantines, as well as their alliances and arranged marriages. A rich source, the Chronicle of Morea brims with anecdotes giving insight into the operation of feudal justice, the role of noble women in feudal society, the practice of chivalry, and the conduct of warfare. Versions of the Chronicle exist in Aragonese, Greek, and Italian, as well as in Old French. However, this is the first translation into English or any other modern language of the Old French text, thus opening its content to a wider audience.

Members of the Medieval Chronicle Society can order it by visiting the following site and using

code ASH07, valid for a 50% discount: https://www.routledge.com/products/9780754631521 .

Proceedings of the XIVth Congress of the International Courtly Literature Society – Lisbon 2013

Parodies courtoises, parodies de la courtoisie, ed. Margarida Madureira, Carlos Clamote Carreto, Ana Paiva Morais. Civilisation médiévale 19. Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2016. 577 p. ISBN 978-2-8124-6061-6.

Entre la subversion comique, l’inversion ironique, le glissement intertextuel et la satire, la parodie désigne ce pharmakon qu’est la culture courtoise où toute norme engendre sa contre-norme, toute affirmation auctoriale donne lieu à un détournement des sources et tout modèle enfante sa réécriture paradoxale
Table des matières

Between comic subversion, ironic inversion, intertextual slippage, and satire, parody designates the pharmakon that is the courtly culture in which all norms engender counter-norms, all authorial affirmations lead to the misappropriation of sources, and all models produce paradoxical rewritings.
Table of contents

This book includes a small number of articles which are directly or partly related to the chronicle or the ‘chanson de geste’.

England

Hardyng’s Chronicle: Edited from British Library MS Lansdowne 204. Vol. I. Ed. James Simpson and Sarah Peverley. TEAMS Middle English Texts Series. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institue Publications, 2015. ISBN 978-1-58044-213-8. $ 29.95.

Like all other editions in this series, this volume is also available on the internet:

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/publication/simpson-pevereley-hardyng-chronicle

Orderic Vitalis: Life, Works and Interpretations. Ed. Charles Rozier, Dan Roach, Elisabeth van Houts, Giles E. M. Gasper. Boydell and Brewer, 2016.

John O. Ward, ‘Ordericus Vitalis as Historian in the Europe of the early Twelfth-Century Renaissaance.’ Parergon 31 (2014): 1-26.

–––, ‘William of Malmesbury: Chronicler, Antiquarian or Historian?’ In Sverre Bagge’s Festschrift (see under “Scandinavia”), pp. 271-313.

[Middle English Prose BrutLe Brut moyen-anglais en prose (version commune des origines à 1333), trad. française de Marie-Françoise Alamichel. Brepols, 2016. 571 p. ISBN: 978-2-503-56760-0. € 90.

France

“Hugo van Fleury, Historia Ecclesiastica. Editio altera,” ed. L. M. de Ruiter. Unpublished PhD Thesis (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, 2016). The full text, with an introduction in Dutch, is available at: http://www.rug.nl/research/portal/files/31809337/Complete_thesis.pdf!null

France / Ireland – See Ireland / France

Germany

Deutsches Literatur-Lexikon Das Mittelalter. Hg. von Wolfgang Achnitz Bd. 3: Reiseberichte und Geschichtsdichtung. Berlin/ Boston: De Gruyter 2012. 1240 Spalten.

Der Titel ist nicht ganz korrekt: Der Band verzeichnet, in chronologischer Reihung, lateinische wie deutschsprachige Chronistik des Reiches sowie die Reise- und Pilgerberichte.

 Verfasser-Datenbank

Autoren der deutschsprachigen Literatur und des deutschsprachigen Raums: Von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart. [Database of Authors: Writers of German-Language Literature and the German-Speaking World – From the Beginning to the Present Day]; see: https://www.degruyter.com/view/db/vdbo .

From 2012 on, the Verfasser-Datenbank (Database of Authors) enables, for the first time, the renowned standard reference works Die deutsche Literatur des MittelaltersDeutscher Humanismus 1480-1520Frühe Neuzeit in Deutschland 1520-1620 and the Killy-Literaturlexikon to be used systematically in electronic form. Over 20,000 lexicon articles on authors of German literature, ranging from the very beginnings to the present, were cross-linked in the database and their content can be accessed in a targeted manner using differentiated search criteria. In ongoing updates, the part of the database relating to the Middle Ages is revised in terms of content and supplemented by many current literature references which are linked to the library collections. An advisory board of established experts guarantees the high academic quality of the content revision.

  • Based on over 20,000 articles, the database provides comprehensive and reliable information about literary authors in the German-speaking world from the Middle Ages to the present
  • Targeted research by names, titles of works, epochs, manuscripts, places of printing, literature references etc.
  • Ongoing content revision of the ‘dictionary of authors’ Die deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters (German Literature of the Middle Ages)
  • Updated references to all articles at publication and a further 3,500 per year
  • Quarterly updates
  • Linking to the library collections
  • Citability ensured thanks to DOI for each article

Items by Jürgen Wolf: KaiserchronikProsakaiserchronikBuch der Könige Alte EeBuch der Könige Neue Ee

 German / Russian

Von mittelalterlichen und neuzeitlichen Beständen in russischen Bibliotheken und Archiven. Ergebnisse der Tagungen des deutsch-russischen Arbeitskreises an der Philipps-Universität Marburg (2012) und an der Lomonossov-Universität Moskau (2013), hg. von Natalija Ganina, Klaus Klein, Catherine Squires, Jürgen Wolf. Akademie gemeinnütziger Wissenschaften zu Erfurt, Sonderschriften 47; Deutsch-russische Forschungen zur Buchgeschichte 3 (Erfurt: Akademie 2016).

Ireland / France

Keith Busby, Two Irelands: French in Medieval Ireland, Ireland in Medieval French. Turnhout: Brepols, 2017.

It has a long section on La geste des engleis en Yrlande, a vernacular account of the invasion of Ireland by the Cambro-Normans, usually referred to as ‘the English’. It relates the same events as the Expugnatio Hibernica of Giraldus, and may be of some interest to specialists in chronicle studies.

Italy

Luigi Andrea Berto, La guerra, la violenza, gli altri e la frontiera nella “Venetia” altomedievale. Pisa: Pisa University Press, 2016.

Sicily’s Rebellion Against King Charles: The Story of the Sicilian Vespers, trans. with a commentary by Louis Mendola. Trinacria Editions LLC, 2016. 328 p. ISBN: 978-1943639038. $ 26.

This is a translation (with accompanying commentary) of the memoir of John of Procida written as a chronicle in Middle Sicilian around 1290 as Lu Rebellamentu di Sichilia contra Re Carlu. The chronicle of John of Procida brings us the spy story, the swashbuckler, the wartime saga and the morality play in a work that transcends any single genre. For historians, the chronicle is a key source in the study of the Sicilian Vespers uprising of 1282, an event that changed the course of European and Mediterranean history. It is also the earliest known narrative prose (rather than poetry) in a vernacular Italian language, pre-dating by decades the first works of this kind written in Tuscan. Most medieval chronicles were written in Latin, but this one was meant for ordinary people.

Scandinavia

Festschrift for Sverre Bagge: The Creation of Medieval Northern Europe: Christianization, Social Transformation and Historiography: essays in honour of Sverre Bagge. Ed. Leidulf Melve and Sigbjørn Sonnesyn. Oslo: Dreyer Forlag, 2012.

Spain

Jaume Aurell, La Historiografía medieval. Entre la historia y la literatura. València: Universitat de València, 2016. 184 pp. ISBN: 978-84-370-9922-4.

La historiografía medieval, entre la historia y la literatura (The Medieval historiography, between history and literature) analyses the content and forms of historical writing in the Middle Ages, and its projection into modern historiography. The first part of the book explores the historical genres practised by medieval historians such as annals, genealogies, autobiographies, chronicles and urban and universal histories. The second part examines the theoretical and practical problems related to medieval and modern historiography, pointing out key parallels between them. The final chapters focus on the interpretation of recent historiographical tendencies in the interpretation of historical texts, such as new medievalism, new philology, and new historicism.

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Calls for Papers

Congress of the International Arthurian Society: 24–29 July 2017

Since King Arthur figures in many chronicles members may be interested to know that the organisers of the XXVth Congress of the International Arthurian Society at Würzburg University, Germany, kindly invite them to participate.

Conference website

“Brut Narratives, Lawman’s Brut, and the Conception of Britain”: 26–29 June, 2017

Papers on any aspect of Lawman’s vibrant and compelling early Middle English verse chronicle are welcome. But especially encouraged are paper proposals that address comparatively the way that Lawman, Wace, Geoffrey of Monmouth, and/or any other relevant or illuminating Brut narrative, imagine the conception of Britain. For our purposes in this conference “conception” can mean origins, beginnings, and genealogies; the concepts and conceits Lawman and other writers turn to in order to constitute Britain as a distinct political, ethnic, and cultural entity; and finally how Lawman and other writers conceptualize Britain as meaningful and significant.

Proposals of 300 words or less should be submitted by Oct. 15, 2016 to:

Joseph Parry

Brigham Young University – Provo, UT 84602 – USA

joseph_parry@byu.edu

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Brief Notices

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger@comcast.net or croiniceoir@gmail.com, to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

==========================================================

Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html
Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/

http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

==========================================================

MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Professor Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Professor Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley<@>liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Professor Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is
@medievalchron so please follow us and spread the word.

Professor Sarah Peverley – School of English – 19 Abercromby Square – Liverpool, L69 7ZG – UK

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The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper
Dept of English – Utrecht University – The Netherlands
E-mail: e.s.kooper<@>uu.nl