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Newsletter 16

28 January, 2016

8th International Conference
The Medieval Chronicle / Die mittelalterliche Chronik / La Chronique au Moyen Age
10–14 July 2017, Lisbon, Portugal

The Organisers

Isabel de Barros Dias – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa

Maria João Branco – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Carlos Carreto – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa

Ana Paiva Morais – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Margarida Alpalhão – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Rodrigo Furtado – Universidade de Lisboa

For more information write to: Isabel de Barros Dias – Isabel.Dias@uab.pt

Four keynote speakers have already accepted the invitation to give a plenary address:

– Hermengildo Fernandes – Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Letras (Medieval History)

– Georges Martin – Paris, Sorbonne / e-Spania Journal  (Literature / ‘Civilisation’)

– Inés Fernández-Ordóñez – Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Literature / Linguistics)

– Peter Linehan – Cambridge University (Medieval History)

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The Medieval Chronicle Society (MCS)

The Medieval Chronicle Society is an international and interdisciplinary organisation founded to facilitate the work of scholars interested in medieval chronicles, or more generally medieval historiography.

Alongside annals, chronicles were the main genre of historical writing in the Middle Ages. Consequently they have always been of great importance to historians. The extent to which they are also of interest to students of medieval literature or of historical linguistics was only fully realised in the latter part of the twentieth century. Since many chronicles are illustrated, they are also a fruitful object of study for art historians.

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The Medieval Chronicle Series

IMPORTANT NOTICE – Permanent 50 per cent Discount for MCS members

As announced in Newsletter 15, the volumes of The Medieval Chronicle are now published by Brill Publishers. As from vol. 10 a few things will therefore be different, e.g. the layout will be made to conform to Brill’s house style. However, for Brill continuity is a key concept, and any changes will be as few as possible.

Members of the MCS are offered a permanent discount of 50 per cent on any volumes of MedChron if these are ordered directly from the publisher at: http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?SerieId=MC .

To obtain the discount price use the discount code: 70257.

The Medieval Chronicle 10 – Complete; to appear early in 2016.

The Medieval Chronicle 11 and 12 – They will include many of the papers presented at the 2014 conference in Liverpool, but of course members of the MCS are welcome to submit essays or short text editions as well.

Deadline for vol. 11: 1 January 2016.

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New Publications

General

Bak, Janos M., and Ivan Jurkovic, eds. Chronicon: Medieval Narrative Sources. A Chronological Guide with Introductory Essays. Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. Pp. 493. €85.00. ISBN: 978-250-3548-333.

Reviewed by Chris Given-Wilson (University of St Andrews), The Medieval Review, 2 April 2015.

McCarthy, T. J. H., ed. and trans. Chronicles of the Investiture Contest: Frutolf of Michelsberg and His Continuators. Manchester Medieval Sources. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014. Pp. xiv, 324. $34.95. ISBN: 978-0-7190-8469-0.

Reviewed by Uta-Renate Blumenthal (The Catholic University of America), The Medieval Review, 7 mei 2015.

The Medieval Review

For those who do not know The Medieval Review, here is some information, taken from their website. It is an open access (free) journal, which since 1993 has been publishing reviews of current work in all areas of Medieval Studies, a field it interprets as broadly as possible. The electronic medium allows for very rapid publication of reviews, and provides a computer searchable archive of past reviews, both of which are of great utility to scholars and students around the world.

http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/tmr

Cyprus

The Chronicle of Amadi. Trans. from the Italian by Nicholas Coureas and Peter Edbury. Nicosia: Cyprus Research Centre, 2015. Pp. xxvi + 580. € 92.

This chronicle is in fact an anonymous compilation and translation of Old French and Greek sources completed in the early 16th century, probably on Venetian Cyprus, and named after its last known owner, the Venetian nobleman Francesco Amadi. The anonymous compiler and probably translator covers the history of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem (1099-1291) and that of the Lusignan kingdom of Cyprus from 1191 to the mid-fifteenth century, translating from a variety of Old French sources, sometimes from versions no longer extant, and from a no longer extant version of the Chronicle of Leontios Malhairas, written in Cypriot Greek. Among the French sources included are a translation of William of Tyre and its Colbert Fontainebleau Continuation, the Annales de Terre Sainte, Philip of Novara, the ‘Templar of Tyre’ and a lost account of the rule of Amaury of Tyre (1306-10) possibly written by Gerard of Monreal.

A review will appear in MedChron 11.

England

John Page, The Siege of Rouen. Ed. Joanna Bellis. Middle English Texts 51. Heidelberg: Winter, 2015. http://www.winter-verlag.de/en/detail/978-3-8253-6426-/Bellis_Ed_John_Page_s_The_Siege_of_Rouen/

This poem is incorporated into the prose Brut and preserved in ten Brut manuscripts. This is the first critical edition of it since 1927, so it will be of interest to Chronicle Society members.

A review will appear in MedChron 10.

France

Lisa Fagin Davis, La Chronique Anonyme Universelle. Reading and Writing History in Fifteenth-Century France. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. vi+439 p., 97 colour ill., DVD. ISBN: 978-1-905375-55-4. € 175.

This volume presents the first comprehensive study of the Chronique Anonyme Universelle, a lavishly illustrated scroll history of the world from Creation to the fifteenth century. Working in a French noble library around the year 1410, the anonymous compiler of the Chronique told the story of humanity – nearly six thousand years by his reckoning – by editing historical texts at his disposal, arranging them in parallel columns on a vertical scroll, and filling the inter-columnar space with complex genealogical diagrams.

Germany

Hans-Werner Goetz, ‘Orosius und seine „Sieben Geschichtsbücher gegen die Heiden“: Geschichtstheologie oder Rhetorik? Kritische Anmerkungen zu einer Neuerscheinung.’ Archiv für Kulturgeschichte 96, 2014, S. 187-98.

A critical discussion of Van Nuffelen’s monography on Orosius.

Italy

Erchemperto. Piccola Storia dei Longobardi di Benevento / Ystoriola Longobardorum Beneventum degentium. Ed and trans. into Italian by Luigi Andrea Berto. Naples: Liguori, 2013.

Russia

Чекова, Илиана. Първите староруски князе светци (Образи, символика, типология). Сoфия, 2013 (Университетско издателство „Св. Климент Охридски”).

[Iliiana Chekova, The First Medieval Russian Prince-Saints (Images, Symbolism, Typology). Sofia: UP, 2013]

Pskov 3rd Chronicle. Annotated translation by David Savignac. Placed online by him at: https://sites.google.com/site/pskovrelease3/.

Work in progress: Novgorod 1st Chronicle

David Savignac has now turned his attention to doing the same for the Novgorod 1st Chronicle. A portion of that chronicle was translated into English a century ago (The Chronicle of Novgorod 1016-1471. Michell, Robert and Forbes, Nevill (translators). Camden Third Series, Vol. XXV. London, 1914), an admirable, ground-breaking feat.  However,  the present availability of extensive lexicographic, linguistic, historical and other research materials as well as a deepening of our knowledge of Old Russian and especially of its Old Novgorod dialect demand that a new annotated translation of this important document be made. The Novgorod 1st Chronicle exists in two recensions. The Michell and Forbes translation is that of the older recension, which is defective and begins in medias res in AD 1016 and was probably essentially completed in the early 1330s; to this Michell and Forbes appended a translation of the younger recension of that chronicle, which ends with the year 1446.  Since Michell and Forbes sometimes used the younger recension to take the place of lacunae in the older recension, it is not always clear which text has been translated. The present work-in-progress will contain complete translations of both recensions, in parallel columns as appropriate; the translation of the younger recension will contain that part of the chronicle absent from the younger recension, that is, from the beginning to the entry to mid-year AD 1016.  This new translation is primarily geared towards English-reading scholars and others without a knowledge of Old Russian. The translation is expected to be completed and placed online by the end of 2016. Dr Savignac, an independent scholar residing in Maryland, USA, may be contacted at dsavignac@aol.com.

Spain

David Hook, ed. The Arthur of the Iberians. Cardiff: University of Wales Press 2015.

The chronicle material in this is naturally confined to those Peninsular texts which include Arthurian references, and such sections naturally focus on the Arthurian content of those chronicles.

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New Websites

Utrecht chronicles online

If you want to know the origin of our logo, the two entwined little dragons, here is the place to look.

On the 2nd of June 2015 the Utrecht Archives (UA) and the University Library of Utrecht (UL) launched a new website which presents eight Utrecht chronicles online: utrechtsekronieken.nl. The eight chronicles are from manuscripts held by either institution. All of them have been digitized, and are complemented by a transcription and in most cases also a translation in Dutch. The latter can be consulted online side by side, and can be searched electronically. Each chronicle is introduced by short texts with information about the institution where it was written, the author, the manuscript, provenance and literature, all in Dutch. The eight chronicles (or chronological texts) are: Catalogus Episcoporum, the ‘official’ list of the bishops of Utrecht and their deeds (covering the period 695-1364 / 1496); Bella Campestria, the battles between the bishops of Utrecht and counts of Holland (1018-1301); Chronicle of the Convent (Vrouwenklooster) near Utrecht (1130 / 1421-1583); Chronicle of the monastery of St Nicolas (Nicolaasklooster) in Utrecht, in two versions (1337-1477); Chronicle of the Carthusian monastery near Utrecht, in two versions, and with a separate text on the foundation of the chapel (1391-1407 / 1438); Chronicle of the monastery in `t Gein to the south of Utrecht (1423-1574); Bellum Traiectinum on the war between Utrecht and Guelders (1525-8); and Aernout van Buchell’s Diarium, a description and history of the city of Utrecht from the Roman times until c. 1630.

For more information:

Bart Jaski, keeper of manuscripts, University Library of Utrecht (B.Jaski@uu.nl)

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Medieval Chronicles from Wales

http://croniclau.bangor.ac.uk/chronicles.php.en

On this site you will find a brief description of most of the Welsh medieval chronicles, both those in Latin and those in Welsh. Each entry contains information about these chronicles, a list of references to editions and discussions, as well as some useful links. For more general links, go to the Useful Links tab in the main menu.

The Harleian Chronicle (A-text of the Annales Cambriae)

The Breviate Chronicle (B-text of the Annales Cambriae)

The Cottonian Chronicle (C-text of the Annales Cambriae)

Epitome Historiae Britanniae

Cronicon de Wallia

Chronica ante aduentum domini

O Oes Gwrtheyrn

Brut y Tywysogion, Peniarth MS 20 Version

Brut y Tywysogion, Llyfr Coch Hergest/Red Book of Hergest Version

Brenhinedd y Saesson

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Calls for Papers

Stockholm University – Centre for Medieval Studies

Historians of Medieval Iberia: Enemies and Friends

A Marcus Wallenberg Symposium

As a means of revitalizing and continuing an institution established by David Lomax and Richard Fletcher,

we shall celebrate a symposium with the theme ‘Enemies and Friends’ in Stockholm on March 14-16, 2016. This theme should be understood widely, and it is intended that it embraces courtly cultures, diplomacy, shift­ing alliances and military and social conflict; rituals of friendship, signs of enmity; patronage and exclusion, exile and execution; odium theologicum, polemic, competition, and coexistence within and between religious communities; charitas and supernatural threats.

The symposium will be opened by the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at Stockholm University,

Prof. Bengt Novén, and the Danish Ambassador to Portugal, His Excellency Michael Suhr.

Keynote speakers are:

Professor Simon Barton (University of Exeter)

Assistant Professor Maria João Violante Branco (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

Professor Simon Doubleday (Hofstra University, NY)

Professor Maribel Fierro (Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid)

We accept short proposals for 20-minute papers, containing an abstract (of about 300 words) and a brief CV, or proposals for sessions containing three such papers.

These should be sent by October 30, 2015 to historiansofmedievaliberia@gmail.com.

The preferred language of the symposium will be English.

Notification of acceptance of proposed sessions and papers will be given on November 30, 2015.

Presenters will be invited to submit their papers for evaluation for a publication of the proceedings edited by the organisers.

A major item of business at the meeting shall be the election of officers to the committee in order to take the society forward.

We look forward to seeing as many of our Iberian medievalist colleagues as possible.

The Organising Committee

Kurt Villads – Jensen Anthony – John Lappin – Kim Bergqvist

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Brief Notices

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger@comcast.net or croiniceoir@gmail.com, to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

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Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html
Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/
http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

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MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society now has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Professor Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Professor Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley[at]liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Professor Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is
@medievalchron so please follow us and spread the word.

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The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper, Dept of English, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

E-mail: e.s.kooper[at]uu.nl

Newsletter 15

28 January, 2016

7th International Conference
The Medieval Chronicle / Die mittelalterliche Chronik/ La Chronique au Moyen Age
7 – 10 July 2014, Liverpool, UK

The Society’s seventh triennial conference convened in Liverpool on Monday 7th July this year, hosted by Sarah Peverly, Godfried Croenen and Rebecca Dixon, together with their delightful team of student helpers who took care of us throughout the four-day event. Once again we had an array of excellent papers from the 80 members in attendance, many of which led to lively and valuable discussions. The key-note speakers were Marcus Bull of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who gave a paper on the eyewitness as the chronicler’s source; Chris Young and Mark Chinca of Cambridge, who spoke about their project on the Middle High German Kaiserchronik; and Anne Hedeman of Kansas on artwork in the Grandes chroniques de France. The technical facilities in the Rendall Building were excellent, and a fine buffet lunch was provided each day in Vine Court, where many of the conference participants were also sleeping. On the Wednesday evening we enjoyed a banquet in the central hall of the Victoria Gallery and Museum. Our General Meeting was held on the Thursday afternoon. On behalf of all those who attended, we extend our congratulations and warmest thanks to the conference organizers for the wonderful welcome and for their smooth running of the whole event.

Graeme Dunphy, International President MCS

In addition to our President’s brief account of the Liverpool conference in general, two decisions of the General Meeting should be mentioned:

  1. After an enthusiastic and alluring presentation by Rodrigo Furtado, members accepted the proposal of the Portuguese team, and decided that the next International Conference should take place in Lisbon, Portugal.
  2. As is well known, the MCS is a virtual society in the sense that, apart from the International President, we do not have an International Executive Committee or any other kind of governing body, nor do we have membership fees. But occasionally some money is needed, e.g. for the upkeep of our website, or as seedmoney for a conference. It was therefore decided that in future from every participant of our international conferences 10 euro will be asked as a contribution to these general MCS expenses. These contributions will be collected by the conference organisers, but kept apart from the regular conference administration. After the conference the money will be transferred to the MCS bankaccount, which for this purpose will be opened by Erik Kooper.

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8th International Conference
The Medieval Chronicle / Die mittelalterliche Chronik/ La Chronique au Moyen Age
July 2017, Lisbon, Portugal

The Organisers

Isabel de Barros Dias – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa

Maria João Branco – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Carlos Carreto – Universidade Aberta, Lisboa

Ana Paiva Morais – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Margarida Alpalhão – Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Rodrigo Furtado – Universidade de Lisboa

For more information write to: Isabel de Barros Dias – Isabel.Dias@uab.pt
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The Medieval Chronicle Series

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Earlier this year Editions Rodopi, the publishing firm with whom we have had such good relations for many years, was taken over by Brill Publishers, the old, well-established Dutch academic publisher. For vol. 9 will still appear in the old Rodopi format, but after this the series will be continued under Brill | Rodopi. This means that from vol. 10 a few things will be different, e.g. the layout will be made to conform to Brill’s house style. However, for Brill continuity is a key concept, and any changes will be as few as possible.

The Medieval Chronicle 9 – Has been sent to the publisher and is expected to appear later this year or early in 2015.

The Medieval Chronicle 10 – Complete; to appear in 2015.

The Medieval Chronicle 11 and 12 – To appear in 2016 and 2017; they will include many of the papers presented at the 2014 conference in Liverpool, but of course members of the MCS are welcome to submit essays or short text editions as well.

Volumes of The Medieval Chronicle can be ordered from bookstores or directly from the publisher: http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?SerieId=MC

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New Publications

General

Elisabeth Mégier, Christliche Weltgeschichte im 12. Jahrhundert: Themen, Variationen und Kontraste.

Untersuchungen zu Hugo von Fleury, Ordericus Vitalis und Otto von Freising.

Beihefte zur Mediaevistik hg. von Peter Dinzelbacher 13. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2010. 437 S.
ISBN 978-3-631-60072-6 (Softcover). € 81.

England

Lisa Ruch, Albina and Her Sisters: The Foundation of Albion.

Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2014.

Many cultures, including Greeks, Romans, French, and British, have taken great pride in legends that recount the foundation of their society. This book demonstrates the contexts in which a medieval British matriarchal legend, the Albina narrative, was paired over time with a patriarchal narrative, which was already widely disseminated, leading to the attribution of British origins to the warrior Brutus. By the close of the Middle Ages, the Albina tale had appeared in multiple versions in French, Latin, English, Welsh, and Dutch. This study investigates the classical roots of the narrative and the ways it was manipulated in the Middle Ages to function as a national foundation legend. Of especial interest are the dynamic qualities of the text: how it was adapted over the span of two centuries to meet the changing needs of medieval writers and audiences.

The currency in the Middle Ages of the Albina narrative is attested to by its inclusion in nearly all the extant manuscripts of the Middle English Prose Brut, many of the French and Latin Bruts, and in a variety of other chronicles and romances. In total, there are over 230 manuscripts surviving today that contain versions of the Albina tale.

Michelle R. Warren, ed. Situating the Middle English Prose Brut.

Published in The Journal of Digital Philology 3.2 (2014) – out this December

(See their website: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/digital_philology/)

Contents:

Michelle R. Warren, ‘Situating Digital Archives’

Deborah Howe and Michelle R. Warren, ‘The Dartmouth Brut: Conservation, Authenticity, Dissemination (a photo essay)’

Edward Donald Kennedy, ‘Fifteenth-Century Historiography and the Dartmouth Brut

Lister M. Matheson†, ‘Contextualizing the Dartmouth Brut: From Professional Manuscripts to “The Worst Little Scribbler in Surrey”’

Ryan Perry, ‘Making Histories:  Locating the Belfast Fragment of the Middle English Prose Brut

Elizabeth J. Bryan, ‘Deciphering the Brut: Lambeth Palace MS 6 and the Perils of Transmission’

Emily Ulrich, ‘Echoes in the Margins: Reading the Dartmouth Brut in Early Modern England’

Julia Marvin, ‘Making Sense of Annotations in Brut Manuscripts’

Matthew Fisher, ‘Encountering the Dartmouth Brut in the Midst of History’

Wales / England

Alicia Marchant, The Revolt of Owain Glyndŵr in Medieval English Chronicles. York Medieval Press/ Boydell and Brewer, 2014. ISBN: 9781903153550. Pages: 290. £ 60.

The revolt of Owain Glyndŵr (1400-c.1415) was a remarkable event in both English and Welsh contexts, and as such was narrated by a number of chroniclers, including Adam Usk, John Capgrave, Thomas Walsingham and Edward Halle. They offer a range of perspectives on the events, as well as portrayals of the main characters (especially, of course, Glyndŵr himself), the communities involved, and Wales.

This book studies the representations of the revolt in English chronicles, from 1400 up to1580. It focuses on the narrative strategies employed, offers a new reading of the texts as literary constructs, and explores the information they present.

Alicia Marchant is a Research Associate in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at the University of Western Australia.

 Germany

Patrizia Carmassi / Eva Schlotheuber / Almut Breitenbach (Hgg.), Schriftkultur und religiöse Zentren im norddeutschen Raum. Wolfenbütteler Mittelalter-Studien Bd. 24. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2014. ISBN978-3-447-10016-8; 548 S., 87 Schwarzweiß- und 19 Farbabbildungen. € 108.
Viele der 11 Beiträge behandeln oder benutzen immer wieder norddeutsche Chroniken des 12.-15. Jahrhunderts. Besonders wichtig: Hedwig Röckelein, Schriftlandschaften – Bildungslandschaften – religiöse Landschaften in Norddeutschland, S. 19-139 – der erste Überblick über norddeutsche Schreiborte des Mittelalters überhaupt. Zwei Beiträge behandeln den Einfluß deutscher Schriftlichkeit auf Finnland und Schwedisch-Finnland, einer den Kulturtransfer der Devotio moderna.

(Rezension von Volker Honemann, zu erscheinen in der Revue d’Historie Ecclésiastique 2015)

Lars-Arne Dannenberg / Mario Müller (Hgg.), Studien zur neuzeitlichen Geschichtsschreibung in den böhmischen Kronländern Schlesien, Oberlausitz und Niederlausitz, Görlitz-Zittau 2013. Beihefte zum Neuen Lausitzischen Magazin 11. 378 S. ISBN: 978-3.938583-99-9. € 30.

Tino Fröde (Hg.), Chronik der Stadt Zittau 1255-1623. Scriptores rerum lusaticarum Bd. VIII. Görlitz 2013. ISBN 978-3-9814990-4-9. € 25.

Sehr interessante deutschsprachige Chronik mit vielen Liedern, makkaronischen Texten, Sprüchen etc. Die Oberlausitzische Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften nimmt damit die alte, renommierte Publikationsreihe der SS rerum lusaticarum wieder auf.

Speer, Christian, ‘Die „Historicae Relationes“ des Sebastian Frank († um 1676). Zur Rückkehr einer verschollenen Chronik nach Görlitz.’ In Görlitzer Magazin. Geschichte und Gegenwart der Stadt Görlitz und ihrer Umgebung 26 (2013): 90–96.

This is a short article about a chronicle that was lost in the Second World War and came back to Görlitz in 2013. This chronicle is a ‘History of Görlitz and the Upper Lusatia’ which is composed of late medieval and early modern chronicles and other sources (partly lost today).

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Calls for Papers

Identity, Ethnicity and Nationhood before Modernity: Old Debates and New Perspectives

24–26 April, 2015, The Oxford Centre for Research in Humanities

The keynote lectures will be given by Caspar Hirschi, Len Scales, Walter Pohl, Susan Reynolds and Tim Whitmarsh.

Scholars working on pre-modern collective identities too often avoid the challenge of modernism, either by using allegedly unproblematic terminology of ethnicity or by employing the vocabulary of nationhood uncritically. This conference, therefore, aims at tackling these difficult theoretical issues head on. This can only truly be achieved by bringing together a range of researchers working on ancient, late antique, early medieval, high medieval, late medieval, and early modern ethnicity and nationhood. Thus we hope to reinvigorate discussion of pre-modern ethnicity and nationhood, as well as to go beyond the unhelpful chronological divisions which have emerged through surprisingly fragmented research on pre-modern collective identities.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of approximately 300 words. Submissions should include name, affiliation and contact details. The deadline for submissions is 1 November 2014. For more information about the conference or to submit an abstract, please email the committee at:

ilya.afanasyev@history.ox.ac.uk or nicholas.matheou@pmb.ox.ac.uk.

William of Malmesbury and his Legacy

3–5 July 2015, The Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, University of Oxford

Keynote lectures will be given by Rod Thomson, Michael Winterbottom and John Ward.

The organizing committee of the conference ‘William of Malmesbury and his Legacy’ invites paper proposals from prospective speakers. This three-day conference, supported by Oxford’s Faculties of History, English and Classics and the Oxford Research Centre for Humanities (TORCH), is timed to coincide with the completion of Michael Winterbottom’s and Rodney Thomson’s edition of William of Malmesbury’s Miracles of the Virgin. When this volume is printed, all works of William will have been published in modern scholarly editions—a momentous occasion which our conference intends to celebrate. In bringing together scholars working on all aspects of William’s works, the goal of the conference is twofold: 1) to review and reflect on existing scholarship, and 2) to encourage further research on one of the most important authors of twelfth-century Europe.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of 200–300 words. Submissions should include name, affiliation and durable contact details. The deadline for submissions is 1 December 2014. For more information about the conference, to join the conference mailing list or to submit an abstract, please email the committee at:

william.malmesbury@history.ox.ac.uk.

Organizing committee: Rod Thomson, Ilya Afanasyev and Emily Winkler

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Brief Notices

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger@comcast.net orcroiniceoir@gmail.com, to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

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Please pay attention, once again, to this request for assistance from János Bak, one of the keynote speakers at our 2011 Medieval Conference in Pécs:

Announcement and request

Chronicon. Medieval narrative sources A chronological guide with introductory essays. Edited – with the cooperation of several scholars – by János M. Bak and Ivan Jurković (Turnout: Brepols, 2013). 496 pp. ISBN 978-2-503-54833-3. EUR 85.

This is an updated and much expanded version of the Bak-Hollingsworth-Quirin guide (New York: Garland 1987, German version Stuttgart: Steiner 1988). While not a critical encyclopedia as Graeme Dunphy’s Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (EMC), it differs from other reference works in that it is not organized by alphabetical sequence but by region and chronology. Simply put: if you want to know what was written in (or about) a given area in a given time period (incl. a selection of saints’ lives), this guide would put you on your way by listing editions, translations and – if available – electronic versions, with reference to the detailed discussion in the EMC or the Repertorium (or the relevant Bibliographia Hagiographica). It covers ‘Europe’ in a wider sense, including narratives – beyond the traditional core of medieval Europe – not only from Byzantium, but also a selection from the Christian East and the Muslim world, from ca. 400 AD to ca. 1500 AD listing 1221 titles. There are three indexes: author/title, personal names, and geographical terms. In addition, eight essays (by Patrick Geary, Hans-Werner Goetz, Courtney Booker, Niall Christie, István Perczel with Irma Karaushvili, Gábor Klaniczay, Norbert Kersken, and Balázs Nagy) discuss genres and types of narratives or regional characteristics of chronicles and biographies.

However, the publishers did not keep their word to bring out this guide for a student-affordable price. Therefore we are planning to rework the material contained in the tables (in another form, thus not covered by Brepols’s copyright) in a year or so – in a digital version, open to all via a www-site.

 We now ask members of Medieval Chronicle and other colleagues to check the published data and communicate to us any mistakes and additions. Since the digital version will not face volume restrictions (which the printed one did) we are now open to additions, including those that were sent to us earlier but had to be dropped (and probably got since lost in one of our computers).

We are looking forward to these with thanks in advance. Should any one need a copy of sections of particular interest to her/him (if the book is not available in a library at hand), we are glad to scan and send specified pages. Our addresses are:

János Bak – bakjm@ceu.hu

Ivan Jurković – ivanj@unipu.hr

===========================================================

Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html
Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/

http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

===========================================================

MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society now has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Dr Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Dr Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley[@]liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Dr Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is
@medievalchron so please follow us and spread the word.

===========================================================

The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper

Dept of English – Trans 10 – 3512 JK Utrecht – The Netherlands

E-mail: e.s.kooper[@]uu.nl

Newsletter 14

4 September, 2014

7th International Conference

The Medieval Chronicle / Die mittelalterliche Chronik

La Chronique au Moyen Age

7 – 10 July 2014

Liverpool, UK

Registration for the 7th International Conference on the Medieval Chronicle is now open. Please register via our online shop (link available here via the conference website):

http://www.liv.ac.uk/histories-languages-and-cultures/research/conference-on-the-medieval-chronicle/registration/

Two types of pass are available: 1) a full conference pass for the duration of the event, including four nights’ accommodation at Vine Court, conference fee covering all four days, all lunches and coffees; 2) a day pass including conference fee for selected day, and lunch and coffees on selected day. Accommodation for day visitors is bookable separately via the shop, as is the conference dinner. Discounted rates are available for students and unwaged delegates. Rooms in Vine Court are limited, so we recommend registering as soon as possible.

When preparing the provisional programme, we have taken into consideration any clashes for speakers participating at Leeds IMC, but please do let us know if we have made any errors.

If you have any queries please contact us via this email address:

medievalchronicle[at]liverpool.ac.uk

We look forward to welcoming you to Liverpool in July.

Best wishes,

The Organisers

 Dr Godfried Croenen (Romance Languages) – G.Croenen{at}liverpool.ac.uk

Dr Sarah Peverley (English) – S.Peverley{at}liverpool.ac.uk

Dr Damien Kempf (History) – kempf{at}liverpool.ac.uk

Dr Rebecca Dixon (French) – Rebecca.Dixon{at}liverpool.ac.uk

 

 

======================================================================

 

Please pay attention to this request for assistance from János Bak, one of the keynote speakers at our 2011 Medieval Conference in Pécs:

 

Announcement and request

Chronicon. Medieval narrative sources A chronological guide with introductory essays. Edited – with the cooperation of several scholars – by János M. Bak and Ivan Jurković (Turnout: Brepols, 2013). 496 pp. ISBN 978-2-503-54833-3. EUR 85.

 

This is an updated and much expanded version of the Bak-Hollingsworth-Quirin guide (New York: Garland 1987, German version Stuttgart: Steiner 1988). While not a critical encyclopedia as Graeme Dunphy’s Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (EMC), it differs from other reference works in that it is not organized by alphabetical sequence but by region and chronology. Simply put: if you want to know what was written in (or about) a given area in a given time period (incl. a selection of saints’ lives), this guide would put you on your way by listing editions, translations and – if available – electronic versions, with reference to the detailed discussion in the EMC or the Repertorium (or the relevant Bibliographia Hagiographica). It covers ‘Europe’ in a wider sense, including narratives – beyond the traditional core of medieval Europe – not only from Byzantium, but also a selection from the Christian East and the Muslim world, from ca. 400 AD to ca. 1500 AD listing 1221 titles. There are three indexes: author/title, personal names, and geographical terms. In addition, eight essays (by Patrick Geary, Hans-Werner Goetz, Courtney Booker, Niall Christie, István Perczel with Irma Karaushvili, Gábor Klaniczay, Norbert Kersken, and Balázs Nagy) discuss genres and types of narratives or regional characteristics of chronicles and biographies.

 

However, the publishers did not keep their word to bring out this guide for a student-affordable price. Therefore we are planning to rework the material contained in the tables (in another form, thus not covered by Brepols’s copyright) in a year or so – in a digital version, open to all via a www-site.

We now ask members of Medieval Chronicle and other colleagues to check the published data and communicate to us any mistakes and additions. Since the digital version will not face volume restrictions (which the printed one did) we are now open to additions, including those that were sent to us earlier but had to be dropped (and probably got since lost in one of our computers).

 

We are looking forward to these with thanks in advance. Should any one need a copy of sections of particular interest to her/him (if the book is not available in a library at hand), we are glad to scan and send specified pages. Our addresses are:

János Bak – bakjm{at}ceu.hu

Ivan Jurković – ivanj{at}unipu.hr

 

======================================================================

 

The Medieval Chronicle Series

 

The Medieval Chronicle IX – Work on this volume is in full progress. It is planned to appear in 2014.

 

Call for contributions for vols. 10 and 11

Members are reminded that we are – of course – already looking ahead to vols. 10 and 11. These will undoubtedly contain many of the papers presented at the Liverpool conference in 2014, but also members who will not be able to attend that conference may of course submit papers.

As from vol. 10 we will – even more so than in the past – encourage members to submit editions of unedited chronicles (or important fragments). A prerequisite is that the editions are accompanied by a sound, state-of-the-art introduction and a good parallel translation (in exceptional cases marginal glosses may be acceptable). For this reason such texts may be longer than the usual articles. For an example, see Jeffrey S. Widmayer, ‘The Chronicle of Montpellier H119: Text, Translation and Com­mentary’, in MedChron 4 (2006): 231-61.

==========================================================

 

New Publications

General

  1. A. Berto, The Political and Social Vocabulary of John’s the Deacon’s ‘Istoria Veneticorum’. Cursor Mundi 12 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013).

 

England

Paul Remfry has recently published a translation of the Wigmore Chronicle

(see http://www.castles99.ukprint.com/Essays/Wigchron.html).

He is currently working on a new translation and indepth commentary on the Aberconwy chronicle and thinking about tackling the Tewkesbury chronicle. Some years back he produced a translation of the Annales Cambriae.

Germany

Christian Speer, ‘Die lateinische Chronik (1131 – 1484) des Görlitzer Altaristen Stephan Furmann. Edition – Kommentar – ergänzende Quellen.’ In Thomas Binder, Hrsg. 666 Jahre Sechsstädtebund. Veröffentlichungen aus dem Stadtarchiv Kamenz 1. Görlitz/Zittau: Gunter Oettel, 2012. Ss. 39-84.

===========================================================

 

Conferences

 

Spain

Reinas e infantas en los reinos medievales ibéricosSantiago de Compostela, 21-22 May 2014.

See: http://reinaseinfantasmedievales.weebly.com/

 

Portugal

GEMELA invites abstracts for its biennial conference in Lisbon, Portugal, September 8-10, 2014. Could you please take a moment and forward this Call for Papers to your fellow professors and graduate students? See attached for the Call for Papers or check out our website: http://www.gemela.org

 

GEMELA invita propuestas para su próximo congreso en Lisboa, Portugal, el 8-10 de septiembre de 2014. Favor de compartir esta información con colegas y estudiantes graduados interesados en el tema. Ver la convocatoria o nuestro servidor por más información al respecto: http://www.gemela.org

 

GEMELA convida propostas para o nosso próximo congresso em Lisboa, Portugal, o 8-10 do setembro do 2014. Favor de compartir esta informação com colegas e estudantes graduados interessados no tema. Ver a chamada de trabalhos ou nosso servidor: http://www.gemela.org

 

Stacey L. Parker Aronson

Associate Professor of Spanish

GEMELA, Secretary

University of Minnesota, Morris

600 East 4th Street

Morris, MN 56267

Tel.: +1.320.589-6290

e-mail: aronsosp{at}morris.umn.edu

 

===========================================================

Calls for Papers

Anglo-Norman Texts, Language and Contexts

The Anglo-Norman Dictionary (www.anglo-norman.net) is interested in sponsoring a session or series of sessions at the Leeds IMC 2014 devoted to new research on Anglo-Norman texts and  their contexts. We are particularly interested in hearing about new texts, new editions of texts, and texts that fall outside of the literary context. Paper topics could include, but are not limited to:

-the use of Anglo-Norman in literary and non-literary contexts

-the intended audience of Anglo-Norman texts throughout the medieval period

-the transmission of Anglo-Norman texts

-the revision, annotation or translation of Anglo-Norman texts

-the inclusion of Anglo-Norman with texts in other languages

-the manuscript context of Anglo-Norman works

-the use of Anglo-Norman outside England

 

Dr. Heather Pagan

Editor, Anglo-Norman Dictionary

http://www.anglo-norman.net

Aberystwyth University

 

Portugal

The APEF (Association Portugaise d’Études Françaises) is organising an issue of Carnets – Revue Électronique d’Études Françaises devoted to the chronicle: “Frontières de la chronique”.

For more information, contact:

Ana Paiva Morais
Professora Associada / Associate Professor
email: anapm{at}fcsh.unl.pt

 

Departamento de Lìnguas, Culturas e Literaturas Modernas  / Departament of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas / Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities

Universidade Nova de Lisboa / New University of Lisbon

Av. de Berna, 26-C
1069-061 Lisboa

===========================================================

 

Brief Notices

Boydell & Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series

Prospective editors of medieval chronicles are invited to contact Dan Embree, Editor of Boydell and Brewer’s Medieval Chronicles Series, at sothsegger{at}comcast.net to discuss projects. We encourage discussions at any stage from vague stirrings to substantial drafts. We are interested in editions of medieval texts in various languages, of collections of short, related texts, and of  previously (but inadequately) edited texts.

 

New Series: “Outlaws in Literature, History, and Culture”

Alexander L. Kaufman (Auburn University at Montgomery, USA) and Lesley A. Coote (University of Hull, UK) are co-editors of a new book series for Ashgate Press and would welcome proposals: “Outlaws in Literature, History, and Culture”. More information on the scope of the series can be found at http://ashgate.com/outlawstudies.

 

===========================================================

 

Research Stipends

Notre Dame’s programs for visiting medievalists (from Julia Marvin)

The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame has several year-long and short-term programs for visiting scholars, including an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Studies (for faculty at US institutions), Stipends for Short-term Postdoctoral Research, Stipends for Ambrosiana Microfilms Collection Research,  and the SIEPM Fellowship in Medieval Philosophy. For more information, see

http://www.nd.edu/~medinst/funding/funding.html
Notre Dame has substantial collections of microfilms and facsimiles, which may be searched here:

http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_microfilms/
http://medieval.library.nd.edu/mss_facs/

http://homepages-nw.uni-regensburg.de/~dug22463/FAZ_22May2011_p60-63.PDF

 

===========================================================

 

MCS Twitter Account

The Medieval Chronicle Society now has a Twitter account to accompany its website. The account is being run by Dr Sarah Peverley (University of Liverpool) and will be used to provide short updates about the 2014 Medieval Chronicle conference, other chronicle conferences and symposia (which have reached the ‘call for papers’ stage), large funded research projects involving medieval chronicles, and newly published editions and/or monographs on chronicles. If members would like Dr Peverley to ‘tweet’ about any of the above on their behalf please contact her at S.Peverley{at}liv.ac.uk. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters and to avoid being overwhelmed with requests Dr Peverley will only ‘tweet’ about publications and events that are chronicle related. The Twitter account is
@medievalchron so please follow us and spread the word.

 

Dr Sarah Peverley, School of English – University of Liverpool

 

===========================================================

 

The Medieval Chronicle Society – https://medievalchronicle.org/

 

For information contact:

Dr Erik Kooper

Dept of English

Trans 10

3512 JK Utrecht – The Netherlands

E-mail: e.s.kooper{at}uu.nl